Logophile for Queens

Here’s a royal theme to give us an excuse to play with some words. I am sure the pedants out there can explain whether “queen” is both singular and plural. I haven’t bothered to dig too deep on that one, but I have a suspicion that the plural of queen can be both ‘queen’ and ‘queens’. Anyone have the good oil on that one?

My focus is with the types of queen and the verbiage which relates to them. There are two main types of queen. A queen regent and a queen consort. When the ruling monarch is a queen then she has regal power. She is the ruling authority, as is currently the case in England with Queen Elizabeth II. Queen Elizabeth carries royalty in her blood and so she is queen regent.

When I was young I couldn’t understand why the Queen’s husband, Prince Phillip, was not the king. The reason is that he is not of the royal lineage and has no right to the throne. His wife is his monarch.

Where a king is on the throne his wife is designated as a queen. She is a queen consort, since she is his consort. Consort comes from an Old French word meaning to ‘share with’. Any group or person who cooperates with another could be designated a ‘consort’.

Consort, therefore, includes any spouse. It also includes such collections as a musical ensemble and it refers to one who tags along, including a ship which accompanies another. In common usage it is often used in a negative connotation, such as saying that someone consorts with unsavoury friends.

Now, having put ‘regent’ and ‘consort’ onto the table let’s have a look at the vocabulary that springs from them.

Regent is linked to regal. Regal gowns are known as regalia, although that term is often used in a light-hearted fashion when describing the elaborate costume of an ordinary person. “Decked in his official regalia the yacht club captain struck a handsome pose.”

Consort gives us more room to explore. We can have a consortium, being a collection of things which go together. A consortium may be a group of companies which collaborate together in a project or enterprise.

Legally the term consortium refers to the emotional bond shared between parent and child or husband and wife. It also refers to the conjugal blessings which a married couple can share.

Consorting is given almost criminal implications when the police notice a person mixing with the wrong company.

A Dowager Queen is one who has received a dowry, including her status as queen. It seems logical that only a queen consort could become a dowager queen, since a queen regent would not receive an endowment from their spouse.

A Queen Mother refers to a queen consort whose husband, the king, has died and the monarchy has passed to one of her children. She is thus the mother of the monarch, and yet a queen, not losing that title when the king dies.

Now, I have no idea why these words took my fancy, but I have successfully distracted you with them. If you are a lover of words you won’t mind the distraction. If you are a pedant you are probably distracted by holes in my definitions and you may wish to correct and expand my observations. Please feel free to do so. The joy of words is to use them, explore them and apply them where they can enrich our understanding and experience.

Logophile Lunacy Three

Have I worn you out yet? There’s more! Or should I say, “Here’s More!”

The objective of the game is to decode the verbage and recast it into a selection of your own making – so we end up staring at some vocab we’ve hardly seen before. And it’s all about my favourite 2 R’s – which were…… now what were they again? I wonder if you can recall, Hmmmmm ???

Get to it …..

“It is germane to note that this robustious habitué is under the aegis of a denizen of this place, an avuncular eremite, who will expiate his fatuous arrogation of title.

Though others inveigh the grandiloquent concatenation by which he avoids each contretemps, he manages to exculpate himself from mordant limn and continue in his bon ton.

He lacks nescience of the imbroglio his arrant foolery has generated. He continues with the hubris of a mountebank in the depredation of each complaisant and venal quisling who seeks his apotheosis.”

Logophile Lunacy Two

As if ‘one’ wasn’t enough, here we go again with another dose of Logophile Lunacy.

The object of the game is for you to crack the sentence, decipher the basic message and re-compose some syllables that say the same thing, but expose us to vocab we may not regularly use.

So, have a go. You’ll have to check your own or on-line dictionary for the meanings and they you can thesaurus up a new way to say the same thing.

I’m building this passage up as we go along – so you will get the first sentence repeated from an earlier past. That’s deliberate – it’s called “Repetition and Recall”, my favourite 2 R’s of Learning.

Oh, and you can actually post your replies on the Forum, under Mind Zone.

“It is germane to note that this robustious habitué is under the aegis of a denizen of this place, an avuncular eremite, who will expiate his fatuous arrogation of title.

Though others inveigh the grandiloquent concatenation by which he avoids each contretemps, he manages to exculpate himself from mordant limn and continue in his bon ton.”

Logophile Lunacy One

The easiest way to add new words and meanings to your vocabulary is to use them and to repeat them over and over again. These keys are the Extra Two R’s I have mentioned before – Repetition and Recall.
So, to pump a few extra words into your head I’ve compiled a little bit of Logophile Lunacy. I have composed a short description of a situation. Over the next week or so I will present you with more of the description, repeating parts already given.
Your challenge is to be able to read the nonsense and make as much sense of it as you can.
Note: I will not be giving you the meanings of the words I have chosen. You need to grab a dictionary or do an on-line search for the meanings. And, to give the exercise more twist – see if you can convey the same information using different words, maybe words we’ve hardly seen before. Ping those creative works to me and I’ll share them with my readers. Alternatively, go to the Forum at chrisfieldblog.com/forum and find the post under Mind Zone – where you can add your feedback there.
Now…. Here is the first sentence of Logophile Lunacy One.
“It is germane to note that this robustious habitué is under the aegis of a denizen of this place, an avuncular eremite, who will expiate his fatuous arrogation of title.”

Logophile – Aplomb

Which substance is behind the word aplomb?
You may hear tell of someone who displays much aplomb. You may, as I always did, associate that with someone who spoke with a plum in their mouth. The notion of determined correctness could come to my mind. A person with aplomb was always imagined by me as being severe and unpleasant.
Certainly the word does speak of someone who is unflappable. It speaks of poise and self-control. It doesn’t require a sense of severity, but of being balance and well managed.
The word derives from the idea of a plumb-line. That’s a string with a weight on the end, which is suspended from a height so that gravity keeps it straight. Builders, bricklayers and other people involved in construction might use a plumb-line to ensure their vertical structures are truly ‘vertical’.
Now, my question was, Which substance is behind the word aplomb?
The answer is, lead. It comes from the Latin word for that soft, heavy metal, ‘plumbum’. If you studied chemistry in school you will know that the chemical symbol for lead is Pb. That’s because Pb is an abbreviation of ‘plumbum’.
So aplomb is a concept that developed from the use of lead weights on a string.
Which substance should come to mind? No, not String!!! But lead.
And, for you Biblophiles (or is it Bibliophiles? – I mean “Bible lovers”), the prophet Amos saw a vision of a plumbline and heard God say the people would be judged against God’s standard. The Apostle Peter then spoke about judgment beginning at the house of God – among God’s people. So, he asks, what hope do the heathen have? (See 1Peter 4:17).